Data



The Big Shift – Did it Happen?

By Emily Muttillo
Applied Research Fellow
September 14, 2017

 

In a previous blog, the CCS Research team identified some trends we would be looking for in the U.S. Census Bureau data released today.  The big day is here – let’s take a look! 




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Census Update: Ohio’s Uninsured Rates Continue to Decline

By Kate Warren
Research Associate
September 14, 2017 

Looking at Census insurance data is a great example of how policy can truly move the needle on issues facing our communities. The Affordable Care Act and Medicaid Expansion have allowed hundreds of thousands of Ohioans to access the healthcare they need, and the number of people impacted by this policy grows each year.

In the state of Ohio, as in the nation, the number of uninsured people dropped once again in 2016. Between 2015 and 2016, an additional 102,548 Ohioans gained health insurance coverage, a statistically significant change. The number of uninsured people in the state dropped 14 percent. As of 2016, only 5.6 percent of Ohioans lacked health insurance coverage, compared to 6.5 percent in 2016.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates







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Is Cleveland Shrinking or Growing in Population?
By Emily Muttillo, Applied Research Fellow & Kate Warren, Research Associate
September 14, 2017

In a previous blog, the CCS Research team identified some trends we would be looking for in the U.S. Census Bureau data released today.  The big day is here – let’s take a look! 

 4. Did Cleveland stop losing people?
Estimates of Cleveland’s population have declined each year since 2010. Meanwhile, community development projects are bringing residents back into the city.  Has it been enough to halt the negative population growth? The data will tell.





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Poverty Numbers in Cleveland – It’s Complicated
By Emily Campbell
Associate Director and Williamson Family Fellow for Applied Research
September 14, 2017

The research team of the Center for Community Solutions has been waiting all year to see if the improvements in poverty rate in Cleveland would continue. With today’s 2016 data release from the U.S. Census Bureau, the answer is… probably not.


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New Census Data Show Income Increased, and 
Poverty and Uninsured Declined in 2016
By Joseph Ahern
Fellow, Applied Research
September 12, 2017

Newly released reports from the Census Bureau’s Current Population Survey (CPS) show that median household income increased in the United States between 2015 and 2016, and the poverty rate and the percent of people without health insurance declined in the same period.

Median household income nationally in 2016 was $59,039, an increase from 2015 of 3.2 percent after adjusting for inflation. The median income of married-couple families increased by 1.6 percent to $87,057, and that of female-headed families increased by 7.2 percent to $41,027. Although most racial and ethnic groups saw increases, disparities persisted, with households headed by non-Hispanic Whites making $65,041, as compared to $39,490 for African Americans and $47,675 for people with Hispanic/Latino ethnicity.  Among full-time year-round workers, women earned a median of $41,554 compared to $51,640 for men. However, the female-to-male earnings ratio of 0.805 represented its first annual increase since 2007.




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New Data Next Week! What Community Solutions Will Look For

By Emily Campbell
Associate Director, Williamson Family Fellow for Applied Research
September 6, 2017

Each year, the U.S. Census Bureau releases an updated set of data about housing, income, employment, family structure, and health insurance coverage.  The 2016 Current Population Survey and 2016 American Community Survey one-year estimates are both scheduled for release the week of September 11. We, at The Center for Community Solutions, are anxiously awaiting these releases and are ready to quickly and accurately analyze the data. Below are some things we will examine.

1. Will the improving poverty trend continue? 
Last year, poverty in the City of Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, and in communities across the state dropped, in some places by statistically significant amounts. In Cleveland, child poverty in particular dropped from an estimate of 58.5 percent in 2014, to 49.9 percent in 2015. If poverty holds steady or continues to decline, it’s a good indication that the prospects of low-income Ohioans have truly improved. But it is possible that the large declines shown last year were somewhat of a data anomaly. Our research staff each have a different appraisal of what will happen – will poverty continue to fall, go back up, or hold steady, and will any change be statistically significant?





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Four Compelling Facts (and One Excellent Report)

Emily Campbell
Associate Director and Williamson Family Fellow for Applied Research
August 2, 2017

United Way of Greater Cleveland recently unveiled its community assessment. With the help of The Center for Community Solutions, United Way staff examined a host of data on education, income, health, and basic needs. The resulting report represents an excellent collection of indicators of community conditions in Greater Cleveland. United Way found new ways to put the raw numbers into perspective. Of all the information shared during the report release event, there are four facts which stand out.

  1. While unemployment has fallen in the past several years, the unemployment rate for Cleveland residents remains higher than that in the rest of the county. United Way pointed out that the number of Cleveland residents who are unemployed is greater than the entire population of the City of Solon.

  2. The gap between median income in Cleveland and median income in Cuyahoga County is more than $16,000. That is enough to afford mortgage payments on a $90,000 house.

  3. Based on data from AAA, an older adult living at the poverty line would have to spend more than 75 percent of their income in order to own and maintain a car. 

  4. People with mental illness are no more likely to commit a violent crime than those without mental illness. But, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, they are ten times more likely to be the victim of violent crime.      

The full report provides many more insights into the challenges facing our community. It also explains how United Way will respond, while showing opportunities to improve health, social, and economic conditions.


Census Bureau Prepares for 2020 Census
and Continues Annual American Community Survey

Joseph Ahern, Research Fellow
February 10, 2017

On April 1, 2020, a little over three years from now, the U.S. Census Bureau will conduct its decennial Census, counting every person and housing unit in the country. The Census is mandated by the U.S. Constitution with its primary purpose to provide data for apportioning seats in the House of Representatives among the states. Planning activities for 2020 have been underway since the last Census in 2010 and will be accelerating as the decade comes to an end. These activities include compiling address lists, updating geographic databases, finalizing the questionnaire, and designing and testing logistical procedures.


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The Results Are In! Community Solutions’ 2016 Audience Survey
By Emily Campbell
Associate Director | Senior Fellow / Williamson Family Fellow for Applied Research
November 28, 2016

Every year, The Center for Community Solutions surveys our audience to find out what they think are the most pressing issues facing Ohio, and to get a sense of areas of strength and opportunities for improvement in our work.  The 2016 online survey was conducted over the course of three weeks in September and October.  In total, 410 people responded, representing nonprofit organizations, government agencies, private and public companies, philanthropy, and higher education.  While respondents were concentrated in Northeast Ohio and around Columbus, we received feedback from all corners of the state.


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Cleveland Neighborhood Profiles: Highlights from the Data
By Kate Warren
Policy & Planning Associate
October 24, 2016

This week, Community Solutions released profiles for each of Cleveland’s neighborhoods. Check out the profiles here. In this blog, I’ll share some of the highlights found in the data. Look out for another blog later in the week where I will call attention to some neighborhoods to watch, for better or worse.

Demographics
Cleveland’s neighborhoods vary in size, though some are very populous. Kamm’s, Glenville, and Old Brooklyn each have more residents than the city of Solon. The Downtown, University, and Edgewater neighborhoods have the lowest percentage of children (4 percent, 7 percent, and 13 percent respectively), while Cuyahoga Valley, Central, Buckeye-Woodhill, and Kinsman each are comprised of at least 30 percent children. The highest proportions of older adults (age 65+) live in Fairfax, Lee-Seville, and Lee-Harvard.




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Census Highlights: What do the Latest Census Data Tell Us about Northeast Ohio?

By Kate Warren
Policy & Planning Associate
September 15, 2016

Today the U.S. Census Bureau released its American Community Survey one-year estimates for 2015. These estimates are only available for geographies with populations of 65,000 or more, meaning that in Ohio we can look at data for most of our counties, and a few of our larger cities. Many of the local changes in the data reflect what we saw in the national data released on Tuesday.[1]  Ohio is seeing falling poverty rates, rising median household income, and falling rates of uninsured.

Poverty is Declining & Income is Rising
Mirroring the national trend, poverty has decreased over the past year for many Northeast Ohio communities. Despite progress in many communities, nearly 1.7 million Ohioans were living below poverty in 2015. While Cleveland remains one of Ohio’s poorest cities, with more than one in three of its residents living below the poverty threshold, its poverty rate dropped significantly from 39.2 percent in 2014 to 34.7 percent in 2015. Akron’s poverty rate rose to 25.9 percent over the past year (though the difference between 2014 and 2015 in Akron is not statistically significant).






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