State of Ohio Health and Human Services 2022

By: Staff
Loren Anthes, Senior Fellow/William C. and Elizabeth M. Treuhaft Chair for Health Planning

Natasha Takyi-Micah, Public Policy & External Affairs Associate
Kyle Thompson, Policy Assistant


Our claim to fame at The Center for Community Solutions has evolved over the past decade– from our Follow the Money books, to our extensive State Budgeting Matters reports to our Dear Mayor series and a myriad of resources in between. Arguably what we are most known for, however, is our community fact sheets – colorful and easy-to-read jurisdiction-specific data created with elected officials and community leaders in mind, to use as foundation and evidence for advocacy.  

A new State of Health and Human Services data set

In preparation for the upcoming gubernatorial election in Ohio, the COVID-19 program unwind, and various changes on the federal level including the Dobbs decision, Community Solutions has created an overview of the current health and human services environment in Ohio. Informed by our own priority areas, policy and research work, and public datasets, we have generated a snapshot of Medicaid, Older Adults, Maternal and Infant Health, The Safety Net, and Behavioral Health. 

Community Solutions has created an overview of the current health and human services environment in Ohio, informed by our own priority areas, policy and research work, and public datasets.

Revealed: new crises or foundational flaws?

While some of the data presented may be shocking, it is important to keep in mind that our state’s (and country’s) public health and social service infrastructure suffered immensely over the past three years due to the unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic. The data often reveals that truth. It’s possible that the pandemic simply exposed foundational flaws in these systems—such as the clear health disparities people of color face compared to their white counterparts—but didn’t generate new challenges. 

Regardless, we hope that these fact sheets can help our elected leaders identify gaps in services and care and make investments today to help us respond to (or better, prevent!) health crises tomorrow. 

The new contract focuses on population health and new ways to address social determinants, improve community investment and encourage collaboration. 

The quality of life in nursing homes is often determined by the availability of specialized care and culturally appropriate activities for each nursing home resident.

Regulatory reform, increased collaboration with community-based agencies, and a commitment to transparent data are key to maternal and infant health improvements.

Ohio is just 1 of 9 states without remote benefit issuance in the WIC program. A quarter of County Jobs and Family Services calls went unanswered, 2020-2022.

Youth aged 20-24 died by suicide at a rate of 39% in 2018, the highest in the past decade. Veterans and LGBTQ+ people are at particular risk for suicidal ideation.