Poverty & Safety Net
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Levies on the 2024 Ohio Primary Ballot: What Passed?

Kyle Thompson
Policy Associate
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April 1, 2024
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The Center for Community Solutions published research identifying levies that were on the ballot for the March primary election. Eleven counties across the state had 13 health and human service levies up for a vote. Eleven of the thirteen levies passed. Below is a table with a total breakdown.

Eleven counties across the state had 13 health and human service levies up for a vote.

CountyTypeMillsYearsLevy TypePassed Y/NAthenssenior citizens facilities and services.25 mills5 yearsadditionalYesCuyahogaHHS4.8 mills8 yearsrenewalYesHancockdevelopmental disabilities2.50 mills5 yearsrenewalYesHighlandchildren’s services0.9 mills5 yearsreplacementNoHuronsenior citizen services.85 mills5 yearsreplacement and increaseYesJeffersonsenior citizen services1.2 mills5 yearsreplacementYesLoganchildren's services2.15 mills5 yearsreplacementNoLucasmental health and addiction1 mills10 yearsadditionalYesMorgan (2)aging, develop mental disabilitiesaging = 0.5 mills, dd = 1.28 millsaging = 5 years DD = 6 yearsaging = additional, developmental disabilities = renewalYes (both)Sidney-Shelby Countyhealth department0.3 mills10 yearsrenewalYesWyandot (2)aging1 mill, .8 mills1 mill = 5 years, .8 = 5 years; both are renewalrenewalYes (both)

Cuyahoga County passes Issue 26

In Cuyahoga County, Issue 26 was a ballot measure that The Center for Community Solutions supported. We are glad that residents in Cuyahoga County voted for this renewal levy, ensuring that health and human services will receive support for the next eight years. This levy was overwhelmingly supported by voters, with 71 percent of votes in favor of the tax levy, and 28 percent of votes against the tax levy.

How did other levies perform in the primary?

CountyFor LevyAgainst LevyAthens58.90%41.10%Cuyahoga71%28%Hancock64.21%35.79%Highland44.63%55.37%Huron52.66%47.33%Jefferson68.69%31.31%Logan49.95%50%Lucas52.74%47.25%Morgan (2)DD = 58.25%Aging = 62.87%DD = 41.74%Aging = 37.12%Sidney-Shelby County51.31%48.68%Wyandot (2).8 Mill Levy = 71.94%1 mill levy = 71.10%.8 Mill Levy = 28.06%1 mill levy = 28.90%It wasn’t just Issue 26 that saw passage with significant support.In Wyandot County, both senior citizen services levies passed with 71 percent of votes in favor of the tax levy, with 28 percent opposed.Jefferson County’s senior citizen services levy had a slightly smaller margin of victory compared to Wyandot and Cuyahoga County’s levies, with 68.69 percent of votes in support of the tax levy and 31.31 percent of votes against the tax levy.Morgan County’s aging levy also had similar percentages of support as Jefferson County, with 62.87 percent of votes in favor of the levy and 37.12 percent of votes in opposition of the levy.Hancock County’s percentages of support and opposition similarly reflected Jefferson and Morgan County’s levy, with 64.21 percent of support for the levy and 35.79 percent against the tax levy.

What was the margin of defeat for levies that didn’t pass?

The counties that did not pass levies were Highland and Logan County. Both levies in these counties were replacement levies, and they supported children’s services. Comparing the percentage of defeat on the two levies, Highland County had a slightly higher percentage of voters against the levy, with 55.37 percent against the tax levy, whereas Logan County had a much narrower margin of defeat with 50 percent against the tax levy.

By and large, Ohioans support health and human services levies

Ohioans overall support health and human services funding, supporting levies that will serve residents of respective counties with consistent funding. While Highland County’s children services levy and Lucas County’s children services levy were defeated, this does not overshadow the overwhelming support for health and human services levies.

Ohioans should prepare to vote in the November election.

With the primary election now in the rear-view mirror, Ohioans should prepare to vote in the November election. Community Solutions will continue to provide updates on levies for elections that are crucial to supporting health and human services in the state.

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