Poverty & Safety Net
Article

Cleveland ranks 1-2-3 in poverty

Emily Campbell
Chief Executive Officer
Additional Contributors
No items found.
September 30, 2019
Read time:
Download Fact Sheets
Click here to RSVP
Subscribe to our Newsletter
By subscribing you agree to with our Privacy Policy.
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
Download this as a PDF

Among the largest U.S. cities, Cleveland is worst in child poverty, second for working-age adults and third in older-adult poverty, according to data released by the U.S. Census Bureau last week. Cleveland and Detroit are the only two cities that are in the bottom 10 for all three age groups.

Cleveland is worst in child poverty, second for working-age adults and third in older-adult poverty

Cleveland was the only city in the U.S. with a population of more than 250,000 where more than half the children lived in poverty in 2018. The 2018 one-year estimate of 50.5 percent of Cleveland’s kids living in poverty is more than two points higher than the 2017 estimate of 48.7 percent. We can’t say for certain that child poverty got worse, because the change is not statistically significant, but Cleveland remained dead last.

[table id=75 /]

The high rates of child poverty contribute to the fact that for years, Cleveland has been the second poorest large city in the country, just behind of Detroit. The overall poverty rate did not change between 2017 and 2018, remaining at 33.1 percent. But that doesn’t mean that things stayed the same for everyone. The poverty rate for adults older than age 65 got worse, climbing by 2.7 percent, the biggest jump of any age group. On the other hand, things may have gotten a bit better for working-age adults between 18 and 64. None of these changes are statistically significant, so time will tell if the 2018 figures are a blip or the beginning of a concerning trend for both young and old in Cleveland.

The poverty rate for adults older than age 65 got worse

Ohio is the only state with more than one city in the top 10 poorest large cities, and we have three – Cincinnati ranks sixth and Toledo is seventh.

[table id=71 /]

[table id=72 /]

[table id=73 /]

[table id=74 /]

Download Fact Sheets
No items found.
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
Download report

Subscribe to our newsletter

5 Things you need to know arrives on Mondays with the latest articles, events, and advocacy developments in Ohio

Explore Topics

Browse articles, research reports, fact sheets, and testimony.

Article

Welcome Philip Myers!

June 10, 2024
Poverty & Safety Net
Article

My Experience with SNAP Employment & Training Requirements in Ohio

Community Solutions Team
June 10, 2024
Behavioral Health
Article

Social marketing for the 988 Lifeline to raise public awareness

Kyle Thompson
May 20, 2024
Maternal & Infant Health
Article

Congressional briefing releases 2024 Maternal Mental Health State Report Cards

Natasha Takyi-Micah
May 20, 2024